Author: Commissioner Jim Hosfelt

Kent County Comprehensive Plan Workshops

Do you care about the direction Kent County is headed? Want to be part of the planning process? Then come out to one of the Comprehensive Plan workshops!

All of the workshops are scheduled to begin at 6:00.The Comprehensive Plan workshop schedule is as follows:

Monday, February 26 at the Magnolia Fire Hall

Monday, March 5 at the Kent County Complex (rooms 220 and 221)

Wednesday, March 7 at the Cheswold Fire Hall.

Can’t make it to a workshop? Please complete our survey about the comprehensive plan and let us know what you think is important as we continue to make Kent County the best county in Delaware! Click here for the survey.

Click here to see the Comprehensive Plan draft

Click here to see the Appendices

Public Workshop – Town of Hartly Sidewalk Improvements

Public Workshop – Town of Hartly Sidewalk Improvements

Original Post Link HERE

Hartly Volunteer Fire Company
2898 Arthursville Road, Hartly DE
Tuesday February 20, 2018
4:00 PM to 7:00 PM

The Delaware Department of Transportation (DelDOT) invites the public to attend a public workshop to review and comment on proposed sidewalk improvements along Main Street in the Town of Hartly. This project will include new sidewalks, curbs, crosswalks, and curb ramps along the north side of Main Street between Arthursville Road and North Street, and along the south side of Main Street between Arthursville Road and Slaughter Station Road. The workshop will also provide an update on the project’s schedule.


The Public Workshop will be held on February 20, 2018, at the Hartly Volunteer Fire Company from 4:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m. Interested persons are invited to express their views regarding the proposed project in writing. Comments will be received during the workshop or can be mailed to DelDOT Community Relations, P.O. Box 778, Dover, DE 19903 or sent via email to

Kenton Road and Chestnut Grove Road Intersection Public Workshop

Public Workshop
Kenton Road & Chestnut Grove Road Intersection Alternatives

As part of the K104, Kenton Road, SR 8 to Chestnut Grove Road Project



Original Post Link HERE

Dover High School, Cafeteria
One Dover High Drive, Dover

Wednesday February 7, 2018
4:00 PM to 7:00 PM

The Delaware Department of Transportation (DelDOT) is holding a public workshop to solicit public input on the proposed intersection improvements at Kenton Road and Chestnut Grove Road in Dover, DE.  The Public Workshop will be held on Wednesday, February 7, 2018 at the Dover High School Cafeteria located at One Dover High Drive.  The public is invited to attend anytime between 4:00 p.m. and 7:00 p.m.
The overall purpose of this project is to improve traffic safety and operations and to enhance bicycle and pedestrian accessibility along Kenton Road.  All facilities will be ADA compliant.  Attendees will have an opportunity to review the proposed alternatives at the intersection of Kenton Road and Chestnut Grove Road and provide comments to DelDOT representatives.  In case of inclement weather this workshop will be held on Wednesday, February 14, 2018 from 4 – 7 p.m. in the DHS Cafeteria.
Interested persons are invited to express their views in writing, giving reasons for, or in opposition to, the proposed project.  Comments will be received during the workshop or can be mailed to DelDOT Community Relations, P.O. Box 778, Dover, DE 19903 or sent via email to

Dover Police Release Crime Mapping Feature to Public 1-8-2018

Original post by Dover PD HERE

The Dover Police Department and recently partnered to provide a new way for the public to stay informed about crime in Dover. provides an easy to use platform that maps and analyzes crime data, alerts Dover citizens about crimes in their area, and allows the Dover Police Department to quickly alert the public about crimes as they occur.  The Dover Police Department previously used RAIDS Online for crime mapping information, but transitioned to to provide  information quickly and more accurately to the citizens of Dover.

Dover citizens can view a map and grid with all of the crimes in their area, sign up for neighborhood watch reports that automatically email a breakdown of recent crime activity, and submit an anonymous tip about a crime directly to their law enforcement agency. automatically syncs with the Dover Police Department’s records system to keep crime information updated online and in the mobile app. then displays all of the incidents on a map, grid and analytics dashboard along with some basic information about the incidents, including the type of crime, location type, block-level address, date and time. empowers citizens to better understand crime trends and lower crime in their area. Recent crime incidents are displayed on a map or listed in a grid.  Users can also sign up for neighborhood alerts that automatically send notifications about recent crime activity on a daily, weekly or monthly schedule. is accessible on computer web browsers and via mobile apps.  The app makes all of this information accessible anywhere from a user’s mobile device. The Online Mobile app is available for FREE on both iPhone and Android Platforms and is also available on your mobile or desktop web browsers.


 How does it help your community?

  • Enables the public to stay informed about crime activity while they are away from their computer.
  • Citizens can see crime activity based on their current GPS location.
  • Empowers citizens to better understand crime trends and lower crime in their neighborhoods.
  • Makes it even easier to access near real-time crime information provided by your department. Instructional Video

If there are any questions, or you would like help in using the System, contact M/Cpl. Mark Hoffman from the Dover Police Department Public Affairs Office at 302-736-7130.

Halloween Safety from Dover Police Department 10-16-2017

With the upcoming Halloween events around the City of Dover, the Dover Police Department would like to remind parents, children, and motorists to remain alert and keep safety a top priority during this Halloween season.  While we will have extra officers on the streets and in our neighborhoods on Halloween Night, it is important to take note of the safety tips we have provided below.

Trick or Treat Date/Times:

  • Tuesday, October 31st 6:00PM-8:00PM (City of Dover)
  • Participating homes should have their front lights on
  • Households that are not participating should turn off their front lights

Alternative Trick Or Treat Event:

The Dover Police Department will be holding their 2nd Annual Trick or Treat event onFriday, October 27th from 5:30PM-8:00PM at Legislative Mall.  There will be several law enforcement, fire, and other emergency agencies handing out candy, as well as numerous businesses and organizations with candy and other giveaways.  This event is free for all who attend.  Due to limited supplies it is requested that Trick or Treating be reserved for children 13 and younger.

For more information, visit: DOVER POLICE TRICK-OR-TREAT

Motorist Safety Tips:

  • Motorists are asked to drive with an abundance of caution and travel at a reduced speed in residential areas.
  • Many children and adults will be walking through residential areas and depending on the availability of sidewalks, may be near or on the roadway.
  • Be aware of children inadvertently darting across the street in the path of vehicles.

Trick or Treating Safety Tips:

  • Children should NEVER go Trick or Treating alone.  They should be with a parent/guardian, or a group of friends at all times.
  • Stay off of main roadways.
  • Costumes should fit properly, with no loose/hanging items.
  • Consider face paint instead of masks as they can obstruct a child’s vision.
  • Trick or Treaters should carry a flashlight at all times.
  • Utilize glow sticks and/or reflective tape/material attached to costumes and bags for added visibility.
  • Before crossing the street, always look in both directions twice to make sure no vehicles are coming.
  • Inspect all candy to ensure it is not tampered with, prior to consuming it.

Sex Offender Ordinance for Halloween Festivities:

The Dover Police Department Sex Offender Enforcement Unit would like to remind all offenders living within the City of Dover of the ordinance in regards to Halloween/Holiday festivities.  The Dover Police Department will have extra officers on duty to ensure that offenders comply with the new ordinance, and be on the lookout for suspicious/unsafe activity. If there are any questions or concerns, or you would like to report a non-compliant offender, please notify the Dover Police Department at 302-736-7111.


70-7  Registered Sex Offenders

  1. e)  Prohibited activities for sexual offenders.

(1)  It is unlawful for any sexual offender to participate in a holiday event or practice involving children under 18 years of age, such as distributing candy or other items to children on Valentine’s Day, Halloween, Christmas, or any other holiday or event. Participation is to be defined as attendance at, or taking part of, or cooperation with an event.

(2)  It is unlawful for any sexual offender to wear costumes for the primary purpose of entertaining, attracting, or encouraging interaction with children. 

(3)Any person designated a sexual offender shall be required on October thirty-first of each year or any other day upon which Halloween is celebrated to: 

  1. Avoid all Halloween related contact with children;
  2. Post a sign at his/her residence stating, “No candy or treats at this residence.” Such signs shall be in letters at least two inches high and shall be legible from the street or road adjacent to the residence; 
  3. Except for lighting provided on a year round basis by a sexual offender or the owner or manager of a multi-family residential unit for the purpose of security or walkway or hallway illumination, all outside residential lighting shall be off during the evening hours after5:00 p.m., and no exterior holiday decorations shall be exhibited on the sexual offender’s residence or on the property upon which the residence is located. 

(4)  Holiday events or practices in which the sexual offender is the parent or guardian of the child or children involved, and where no non-familial children are present, are exempt from this section.

Second Annual Dover Police Trick-or-Treat Event 10-12-2017

The Dover Police Department is excited to announce its Second Annual Trick-or-Treat event following an extremely successful 2016 event.  The Dover Police Department, in conjunction with the Downtown Dover Partnership, and City of Dover decided to make the event an annual tradition in the days following the inaugural event, announcing that it will traditionally be held on the Friday preceding Halloween.

On October 27th, from 5:30pm-8:00pm, streets surrounding Legislative Mall will be filled with police cars, fire trucks, emergency equipment, local businesses, and organizations as costumed children Trick-or-Treat at each display.  Families will have a chance to meet their local police and fire personnel, explore the vehicles and equipment they use, get to know more about local businesses and organizations and what they offer to the community, all while Trick-or-Treating.

There is no cost for any of the events or activities for attendees.  While there is no age limit to attend, we kindly request that only children 13 and under Trick-or-Treat.  Costumes are NOT required.  There will be a limited supply of Trick-or-Treat bags to be given away, so attendees are asked to bring their own.

The roadways surrounding Legislative Mall will be closed to traffic and parking beginning at 4pm to ensure the safest conditions for attendees and allow them to freely explore all the historic area has to offer.  Streets that will be closed include:
Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard (North and South) from Legislative Avenue to Federal Street and Legislative Avenue and Federal Street between North and South Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard.

Details for parking will be released closer to the event date.

The Dover Police Department is also inviting local businesses and organization to participate in this event at no cost.  For more information, please contact 302-736-7130.

The event is the newest addition to a series of community outreach events the Dover Police Department regularly hosts.   For more information, please contact M/Cpl. Mark Hoffman at or call 302-736-7130.

Back to School Safety from the Dover Police Department 8-17-2017

Originally posted at: on August 17, 2017

Summer is quickly coming to an end and families across Dover are preparing to send their children back to school in the coming weeks.  The Capital School District begins school on Thursday, August 24th and Caesar Rodney begins Monday, August 28th.  The Dover Police Department is offering the following information to better prepare the citizens we serve for Back to School week.

Police in Schools:
The Dover Police Department has a full time officer dedicated to the Dover High School, Central Middle School, William Henry Middle School, and Parkway Academy.  These officers are otherwise known as SRO’s or School Resource Officers.  We encourage parents to tell their children to communicate concerns with those officers as needed.  The department also has a G.R.E.A.T. (Gang Resistance Education And Training) Instructor at the William Henry Middle School that will also visit elementary schools on occasion as well.  In addition to our four full-time youth officers, the department will increase their presence at schools across the city during the first days of school to ensure a smooth and safe process for all children and school faculty.  There will also be increased presence by the Special Enforcement Unit Motorcycle Division in area school zones, cross walks, and bus routes to crack down on vehicle violations.  People who speed in school zones, disobey crossing guards, or pass school buses will be cited accordingly.

H.A.W.K. Traffic Signal at Dover High School
The Delaware Department of Transportation (DelDot)  installed the new High-Intensity Activated CrossWalK system at the Dover High School main entrance/exit prior to the 2014-2015 school year.  This system is designed to maximize the flow of traffic in what is expected to be a congested area before and after school.  A video showing how the light works can be viewed below.

Tips for Motorists
The Dover Police Department will utilize special enforcement units to increase presence in school zones and on bus routes throughout the city to target speed violations, passing of school buses, and other driving violations that threaten the safety of school children.  The beginning of school is also a time when children are at increased risk of transportation related injuries from pedestrian, bicycle, school bus, and motor vehicle crashes because there are many more children on the road each morning and afternoon and many drivers’ patterns change. Shorter daylight hours make it especially difficult to see young pedestrians and bicyclists. So as schools open their doors, it’s time for everyone – motorists, parents, educators, and students – to improve their traffic safety practices. The following tips can help make this a safe and happy school year for the whole community.
School Bus Safety:

  • It is against the law to pass a stopped school bus while its lights are flashing and its stop arm is extended.
  • On undivided roadways, with no physical barrier or median, vehicles must stop on both sides of the roadway.
  • Yellow flashing lights indicate that the bus is preparing to load or unload children. Motorists should slow down and prepare to stop their vehicles.
  • Red flashing lights and extended stop arms indicate that the bus has stopped, and children are getting on or off. Motorists approaching from either direction must wait until the red lights stop flashing before proceeding.
  • Learn and obey the “alternately flashing warning light” system that school bus drivers use to alert motorists.

School Zone/Bus Stop Safety:

  • When a school bus or children are present slow down and proceed with caution, obeying all traffic laws and speed limits.
  • Obey School Zone speed limits & watch for flashing yellow lights, crossing guards, etc.
  • Be alert and ready to stop. Watch for children walking in the street, especially where there are no sidewalks. Watch for children playing and gathering near bus stops. Watch for children arriving late for the bus, who may dart into the street without looking for traffic. When backing out of a driveway or leaving a garage, watch for children walking or biking to school.
  • When driving in neighborhoods or school zones, watch for young people who may be in a hurry to get to school and may not be thinking about getting there safely.

Walk/Bike to School:

  • Practice taking the route your child will walk before school.
  • Always wear a bicycle helmet, no matter how short or long the ride.
  • Ride on the right, in the same direction as auto traffic.
  • Use appropriate hand signals.
  • Respect traffic lights and stop signs.
  • Wear bright-colored clothing to increase visibility. White or light-colored clothing and reflective gear is especially important after dark.
  • Know the “rules of the road.”
  • Make sure your child’s walk to school is a safe route with well-trained adult crossing guards at every intersection.
  • Identify other children in the neighborhood with whom your child can walk to school.  In neighborhoods with higher levels of traffic, consider organizing a “walking school bus,” in which an adult accompanies a group of neighborhood children walking to school.
  • Be realistic about your child’s pedestrian skills. Because small children are impulsive and less cautious around traffic, carefully consider whether or not your child is ready to walk to school without adult supervision.
  • If your children are young or are walking to a new school, walk with them the first week or until you are sure they know the route and can do it safely.
  • Bright-colored clothing will make your child more visible to drivers.

Back to School Traffic Safety Tips are from the National Safety Council:

If You’re Dropping Off

Schools often have very specific drop-off procedures for the school year. Make sure you know them for the safety of all kids. More children are hit by cars near schools than at any other location, according to the National Safe Routes to School program. The following apply to all school zones:

  • Don’t double park; it blocks visibility for other children and vehicles
  • Don’t load or unload children across the street from the school
  • Carpool to reduce the number of vehicles at the school

Sharing the Road with Young Pedestrians

According to research by the National Safety Council, most of the children who lose their lives in bus-related incidents are 4 to 7 years old, and they’re walking. They are hit by the bus, or by a motorist illegally passing a stopped bus. A few precautions go a long way toward keeping children safe:

  • Don’t block the crosswalk when stopped at a red light or waiting to make a turn, forcing pedestrians to go around you; this could put them in the path of moving traffic
  • In a school zone when flashers are blinking, stop and yield to pedestrians crossing the crosswalk or intersection
  • Always stop for a school patrol officer or crossing guard holding up a stop sign
  • Take extra care to look out for children in school zones, near playgrounds and parks, and in all residential areas
  • Don’t honk or rev your engine to scare a pedestrian, even if you have the right of way
  • Never pass a vehicle stopped for pedestrians
  • Always use extreme caution to avoid striking pedestrians wherever they may be, no matter who has the right of way

Sharing the Road with School Buses

If you’re driving behind a bus, allow a greater following distance than if you were driving behind a car. It will give you more time to stop once the yellow lights start flashing. It is illegal in all 50 states to pass a school bus that is stopped to load or unload children.

  • Never pass a bus from behind – or from either direction if you’re on an undivided road – if it is stopped to load or unload children
  • If the yellow or red lights are flashing and the stop arm is extended, traffic must stop
  • The area 10 feet around a school bus is the most dangerous for children; stop far enough back to allow them space to safely enter and exit the bus
  • Be alert; children often are unpredictable, and they tend to ignore hazards and take risks

Sharing the Road with Bicyclists

On most roads, bicyclists have the same rights and responsibilities as vehicles, but bikes can be hard to see. Children riding bikes create special problems for drivers because usually they are not able to properly determine traffic conditions. The most common cause of collision is a driver turning left in front of a bicyclist.

  • When passing a bicyclist, proceed in the same direction slowly, and leave 3 feet between your car and the cyclist
  • When turning left and a bicyclist is approaching in the opposite direction, wait for the rider to pass
  • If you’re turning right and a bicyclists is approaching from behind on the right, let the rider go through the intersection first, and always use your turn signals
  • Watch for bike riders turning in front of you without looking or signaling; children especially have a tendency to do this
  • Be extra vigilant in school zones and residential neighborhoods
  • Watch for bikes coming from driveways or behind parked cars
  • Check side mirrors before opening your door

By exercising a little extra care and caution, drivers and pedestrians can co-exist safely in school zones.


Bullying or cyberbullying is when one child picks on another child repeatedly. Bullying can be physical, verbal, or social. It can happen at school, on the playground, on the school bus, in the neighborhood, over the Internet, or through mobile devices like cell phones.  The Dover Police Department has full-time officers dedicated to the Central Middle School, Dover High School, and Parkway Academy with another officer that spends time in William Henry Middle School and the various elementary schools throughout the city.

When Your Child Is Bullied

  • Help your child learn how to respond by teaching your child how to:
    1. Look the bully in the eye.
    2. Stand tall and stay calm in a difficult situation.
    3. Walk away.
  • Teach your child how to say in a firm voice.
    1. “I don’t like what you are doing.”
    2. “Please do NOT talk to me like that.”
    3. “Why would you say that?”
  • Teach your child when and how to ask a trusted adult for help.
  • Encourage your child to make friends with other children.
  • Support activities that interest your child.
  • Alert school officials to the problems and work with them on solutions.
  • Make sure an adult who knows about the bullying can watch out for your child’s safety and well-being when you cannot be there.
  • Monitor your child’s social media or texting interactions so you can identify problems before they get out of hand.

When Your Child Is the Bully

  • Be sure your child knows that bullying is never OK.
  • Set firm and consistent limits on your child’s aggressive behavior.
  • Be a positive role mode. Show children they can get what they want without teasing, threatening or hurting someone.
  • Use effective, non-physical discipline, such as loss of privileges.
  • Develop practical solutions with the school principal, teachers, counselors, and parents of the children your child has bullied.

When Your Child Is a Bystander

  • Tell your child not to cheer on or even quietly watch bullying.
  • Encourage your child to tell a trusted adult about the bullying.
  • Help your child support other children who may be bullied. Encourage your child to include these children in activities.
  • Encourage your child to join with others in telling bullies to stop.

Teen Driving:

  • Keep Your Cell Phone Off
    Multiple studies indicate using a cell phone while driving is the equivalent of driving drunk―that’s even when using a hands-free phone. Besides, your state may prohibit the use of cell phones while driving. Many do for drivers of certain ages.
  • Don’t Text
    Research shows texting―on average―causes a loss of focus on the road for five seconds. A lot can go wrong in those five seconds.  Don’t try the “texting-while-stopped” approach, either. And, when you have your head down, you won’t notice key developments that may occur, even when you’re stuck at a red light.
  • Turn on Your Headlights
    Doing so can increase your visibility and help other drivers see you, even on sunny days.
  • Obey the Speed Limit
    Speeding causes about 40% of all fatal teen accidents. That’s especially true when driving on roads with lots of traffic or you’re not familiar with.  Don’t feel pressured to keep up with traffic if it seems like everyone else is flying by you. Driving a safe speed helps ensure your well-being, and keeps you away from costly traffic tickets that can cause a sharp hike in your car insurance.
  • Minimize Distractions
    It may be tempting to eat, drink, flip around the radio dial, or play music loudly while you’re cruising around town; however, all can cause your mind or vision to wander, even for a few seconds. And, that can be enough for an inexperienced driver to lose control of your car, or not notice an obstacle in the road.
  • Drive Solo
    Having a single teen passenger in your car can double the risk of causing a car accident. Adding additional teen passengers causes the risk to escalate.
  • Practice Defensive Driving
    Always be aware of the traffic ahead, behind, and next to you, and have possible escape routes in mind. Stay a safe distance behind the car in front of you in slower speeds, and maintain a larger buffer zone with faster speeds.  A good way to judge a proper distance is to count 2 seconds from the time the front of your car passes where the rear of the car in front of you passed



Delaware State News: Levy Court lays groundwork for U.S. 13 sewer main project

May 2nd, 2017 · by Ian Gronau ·

DOVER — Kent County Levy Court moved toward securing engineering services to plan the replacement of almost 3 miles of sewer pipe along U.S. 13 in Dover at their public works committee meeting on Tuesday night.

The area slated for the extensive “force main rehabilitation project” begins at the county pump station near Delaware Technical Community College’s Terry Campus and terminates near Garden Lane by the Capital Commons shopping area.

According to the county’s public works director, Andy Jakubowitch, beginning the project in the fall may be possible after funding is secured.

The original sewer pipe that rests beneath Route 13 is a concrete one from the 1970s that was recently discovered to be in a serious state of disrepair.

“We had two main breaks recently on Route 13 near the Wawa. Through some investigation, we found that the pipe is in pretty bad shape,” said Mr. Jakubowitch.

During the committee meeting, Mr. Jakubowitch noted that the two possible funding sources his department is pursuing are DNREC and USDA.

“If DNREC funds the project, the labor would be subject to the state wage rates,” he said. “We’re leaning toward the USDA to avoid that. The market’s rates tends to be cheaper than state’s.”

After securing funding, the public works department would need to perform a preliminary engineering report and an environmental impact study — something Mr. Jakubowitch hopes to have in place by mid-summer. At that point, contractors can bid on the project.

The project, unavoidably, would affect traffic, said Mr. Jakubowitch. However, because of the method being used, disruptions could be minimized.

“The work we’re planning on doing would be trenchless,” he said. “We’d use access holes instead, and we’d space them out so we’re not going through intersections. We’d stop work for race days, holidays and things like that as well — like we have in the past.”

Successfully completing the rehabilitation project would also likely address a lingering odor problems that hovers around the Home Depot and Acme on Leipsic Road.

According to Dover public works director Sharon Duca and Mr. Jakubowitch, the odor is from added wastewater flow that’s been “temporarily” diverted from the county’s transmission line under Route 13 to the city’s pump station at the site.

This arrangement was made necessary because of Route 13’s compromised force main. When the rehabilitation project is complete, the added flow can be returned safely to the Route 13 line. For now though, the county’s public works department is using a “blower system” in the city’s pump station to help mitigate the odor.

“We have a temporary blower system that has helped a bit with the odor,” said Mr. Jakubowitch. “We ordered a new blower system that will probably have installed some time next week.”

Reach staff writer Ian Gronau at


Original story here:

Kent County Swears in 2nd District Commissioner, James Hosfelt, Jr.


By Kia Evans – Public Information Officer, Kent County Levy Court

Dover, DE – Republican James Hosfelt Jr., was officially sworn into office at the start of the Tuesday, March 28, Kent County Levy Court Business Meeting. Hosfelt recently won the 2nd District seat, vacated in December 2016 by former Commissioner Bradley Eaby. The Oath of Office was administrated by Kent County Clerk of the Peace Brenda Wootten, while Hosfelt’s wife Sherry held the Bible. When asked about his win earlier this week Hosflet said, “I am very appreciative to the residents of Kent County’s 2nd District for the trust they’ve shown in me. I look forward to meeting and working with all of my constituents in the near future.”


Original story here